Category Archives: Gradients

Wooden Frame Tutorial Part 2


An optional secondary portion of the Wooden Frame Tutorial that will help you make the edges cleaner.

What You’ll Be Making:



Tools:

  • Illustrator
  • Clipping Masks
  • Effect Gallery
  • Gradients

Steps:

7. A. Select the left portion of the frame. And go to Edit>Copy or Cmd+V/Ctrl+V.

B. Then go to Edit>Paste in Front or Cmd+F/Ctrl+F.


8. A. Open the appearance window if you haven’t already. If lacking it, go to Window> Appearance. Select the object we pasted and go to the Appearance window and select the grain effect and delete it (don’t click on the blue text link).

B. Draw a selection box over the left portions so that you select both the object with the grain effect and the one without. Then right-click>Create Clipping Mask.

C. Now we have a clipping mask on the left portion.

9. A. Double-click the clipping mask to get inside it.

B. Increase the size of the frame portion so the that we can get rid of the unappealing edges. It won’t matter how large we make it since the mask will clip the size we set earlier.


10. The left side should look like this now.

11. Repeat the process for the other three portions and it should look like this in the end.

I hoped you enjoyed this tutorial and learned something new. An optional part 2 comes after this but feel free to skip it if you want.

Wooden Frame Tutorial Part 1


A some-what advanced tutorial that will guide you on how to make a wooden frame vector in Illustrator. The next tutorial after this will be about making the cork-board texture.

What You’ll Be Making:



Tools:

  • Illustrator
  • Clipping Masks
  • Effect Gallery
  • Gradients

Steps:

1. A. Create a rectangle as big as you and give it a fill so you can see it.

B. Select it and go to Object>Path>Offset Path.

C. An options window should pop up. Enter a negative value so the object’s offset can go inward. Click the Up/Down Arrow Key to see what suits you. Then click OK. Change its color so you can notice it.

D. Draw some straight segments from the corners of the big rectangle to the corners of the smaller rectangle.

2. A. Have the pathfinder window open. If it’s not open go to Window>Pathfinder. Select both rectangles and the segments and click the Divide button in the Pathfinder window. The Divide button is in the bottom-left corner.

B. The pathfinder will divide all your selected shapes into smaller portions.

C. Select the inner rectangle with the White Arrow Tool and delete it.

D. Also make sure to ungroup the portions so that you can select one part without selecting the other.

3. A. Select the top and bottom portion and add the default linear gradient.

B. Enter -90° for the angle so that the gradient is vertical.

C. Inside the gradient window, double-click the white box and change the color to #B8996F or RGB: 184, 153, 11 or a light brown color. Change the black color to #806C4F or RGB: 128, 108, 79 or a dark brown color.

D. Add another linear gradient to the left portion. Adjust the color of the light-brown color to #C1A175 or RGB193, 161, 117. 

E. Add the same gradient to the right portion but reverse the gradient. The reverse button is the one to the left of the angle box.


4. A. Select the left portion again and go to Effect>Effect Gallery.

B. A window should pop up and should look like what you see below.

C. Locate the grain effect which is in the texture folder like you see below.

D. Change the grain type to Vertical.

E. Change the Intensity to 12 and the Contrast to 20. Then click OK.


5. A. To save time, select the right portion and go to Effect>Grain which will be at the top of the drop-down menu since you’ve used it previously.

B. Make sure the values are the same as last time.

C. Select the top portion and go to Effect>Grain.

D. The only thing to change this time is setting the grain type to Horizontal.

E. Select the bottom portion and go to Effect>Grain.

F. Set the grain type to horizontal again if needed.


6. A. Now you know how to make your own wooden frame. Though, as you can see, there are unappealing white edges on all the frame parts. If you would like to know how to hide them, go to the next part of the tutorial.

I hoped you enjoyed this tutorial and learned something new. An optional part 2 comes after this but feel free to skip it if you want.

Gradual Change


With the events after the art show, I had ran out of things to work on. With day after day, I decided to help some students with tutorials they follow such as mine or others. Luck would have it, no one has worked on an iParent poster and that the competition for Got Plans was still open. With those two in mind, I decided to put some effort in these last days of high school.

This is the final efforts on my Got Plans? poster. I will have an exuberant amount of time for the iParent poster, which is what my current focus is as of now.

I will make a tutorial on how to create a cork-board effect in Illustrator.

Buttons are Back


I received a job some while ago to redesign the API score badge. I took some time to design two (for now) new versions of the badge. One is presented as a target. The other is designed as arrows interacting with each other to form their opposites through negative space. There might also be a new tutorial soon.

UPDATE: The Gallery page was enhanced (fixed icons) to accommodate new pages such as the WallPapers page and the Photos page.

Pace


 

Sorry for the long while but I had many things to be done. Homework, projects, community service, yada yada…

I still have many things to be done including the Self-Portraits and the collaboration projects.

But today, during the Mac Lab Saturday School, I managed to finish the January Desktop Wallpaper Calendar I have worked for some time.

Note: I will plan to upload my logos/calendars onto my DeviantArt page and might try to submit a calendar for Smashing Magazine.

As you can see, I made all icons myself and I plan to make tips on making some specific ones (next semester).

I will likely spend the next days snapping some pictures to finish up all the projects I have.

Still, I have finals and all so I’ll be quite busy again.

Gradient Tip 1


Gradients…love them or hate them, they are still an important tool of a digital artist. They bring out more depth and realism when used. Sometimes they’re not used so effectively.

In this tip, I’ll give you several instances of how to use gradients more effectively.

1. Angle Position


The problem with image is that the gradient is all wrong and it should go at an angle instead of just going from top to bottom (0°). If you have slanted/sloped/steep object, you should be wary of the way you add a gradient to it. If your object is slanted, then when you add a linear gradient from that side, go at a 90º angle from its own angle to get a clean look. See pictures.

2. More Than One Gradient

Sometimes you want to use more than one gradient but you decide it make to easy and use a radial gradient. This is not a good substitute. To fix this problem, we’ll use one solid gradient and one fade-to-(insert color here). The fade-to-color gradient should be on top of the other fills/gradients as seen in the Appearance tab.

3. Ease of Use and Gradient Length

Surely, it’ll be a hassle to keep moving your mouse over to the gradient tab just to simply change a thing or two. But this problem can all go away if your press Opt+Cmd+G/Alt+Ctrl+G to bring up the Gradient Annotator. This shortcut can save you time by not having to move your mouse around so much. I don’t see many students use the Gradient Annotator probably since they don’t know about it.

The top image shows what happens when your gradient can be tool short. Unless you never know that you could drag the gradient tool around on object, you’ll be missing an important shortcut. With the Gradient Annotator on, you can easily adjust the length and angle of your applied gradient so colors can fade more softly.

4. Common Gradient

Surely there would be an easy way to combine gradients of multiple objects and just as you know it, there is. Simple select multiple objects and use the Gradient Tool (g) to draw a gradient through the multiple objects.

Will have more later.

New Years Revolution


Sorry for not posting much information/tutorial during Christmas Break but I was terribly sick and had to bear with Pneumonia. I’m feeling better now and I can’t wait to produce more spectacular art this year.

Current projects i am working as of now include: Desktop Wallpaper Calendar, logos, self-portraits, secret project (with Phillip), etc.

I plan to also develop a simple game in Unity later in the year.

Since I didn’t make any tutorials during the break, I’ll post some new ones starting tomorrow (gradient tip *cough*).

It also fun meeting my old friend Ben Dulay today in the Mac Lab. If you have time, check his blog later (he made it today).

P.S. Sorry for accidentally deleting someone’s comment on my logos (it was marked as spam).

Ma(c)th Clu(la)b


Working in Mac Lab Saturday School and today is way longer than before since the video team was shooting something. I spent my time fixing up my math poster. I would say it’s almost ready for printing. I pen-tooled everything except  the wrinkled paper texture, of course. I added a bunch of textures to the pencil as well as the eraser. I will present the finished piece to Mr. Anderson, hopefully, on Monday.

Perspective Grid Part 1


Today I will show you how to make something similar as this but mostly likely this.

Materials: + Illustrator CS5  +Perspective Tool +Stock Photos +Blend Tool

 

Info: You might have noticed the part 1 in the title, that is because I broke it apart into 2 segments where 1 will get you as far the colored grid while 2 gets you as far as textures and shadows. This tutorial will also teach you a thing or two about the perspective that you’ve probably have never had experience with.

 

Steps:

1. Make a new document. Let’s have a 1000 by 1000 art board so we don’t make things too complicated.

2. Let’s choose the perspective tool from the Toolbar. If you don’t which one it is, just click the shortcut Shift+P to easily bring it up.

3. You’ll see that a 2-point perspective grid shows up. I don’t know about you but I want a 1-point perspective. So go to View>Perspective Grid>One Point Perspective>[1-p Normal View].

 

 

4. Let’s draw a long/thin, brown rectangle on the right side of the art board. Afterwards, drag-copy the same rectangle on the opposite side of the artboard.

5. Let’s select the blend tool (W).  Click one rectangle then the other. Double click the blend-tool in the Toolbar to get the option box. SelectSpacing>Specified Steps and write 10.

6. Select this blend if it isn’t select, then choose the rotate tool. Hold Alt/Option to copy while rotating. Make this copied blend perpendicular to the original.

 

 

7. Select both blends then go to Object>Blend>Expand to make them separate, editable objects.

8. Select everything, Ctrl+A/Cmd+A.

9. Now go to Window>Pathfinder. Then click the unite button under Shape Modes. Now make the united shape, light brown.

 

 

10. Select the rectangle tool. Do you notice the little perspective bubble near the top-left corner, click the left side of the cube that’s in the bubble. Or you could just click 1 (Left Grid).

11. Start from “box 1” that is inside our “grid.” The rectangle will automatically be drawn into perspective, Draw a rectangle where one side touches the left edge of  “box 1” and make this rectangle long. Also, make the rectangle dark brown. See the pictures for reference.

12. . Click and hold the Perspective Tool from the toolbar to bring up the Perspective Selection Tool. Or just click the shortcut Shift+V.


13. Using the perspective selection tool, select the dark brown rectangle. Holding Shift and Alt/Opt, drag copies of the rectangle towards the bottom. Make sure that each copy touches the left side of the grid boxes. Try to get to all the boxes in that column. Afterwards, group these brown rectangles. See pictures for reference.

14. Now this might be tricky but hold on. Select the rectangle group then hold 5+Shift+Alt/Opt to drag copies towards the right. Make sure that each copy touches the left side of the grid boxes.

15. Select all the brown rectangle groups, then click the rotate tool. Alt/Option click the exact middle of the artboard so it will know where to rotate from. So alt/opt+shift drag the rectangles 90°. Cmd+D to do the same thing again.


16. Change the colors for rectangles that are on the sides that are on the left, right, up and down. See the picture if you’re confused.

17. Now select all the rectangles and right-click and choose Arrange>Send to Back. Or click the shortcut PC: Shift+Ctrl+[ or Mac: Shift+Cmd+[.

18. Take time and adjust the positions of each rectangle so they fit precisely on the edges of the grid.


19. Take more time to see if everything is in place and every object is grouped with their similar counterparts.

20. Optional: Draw a square with a gradient, from one corner to another.

21. Optional: Close the bubble in the corner and the perspective grid will disappear. If your happy with this grid then just leave it as is here but if you want to make it look more realistic, proceed to Part 2 of this tutorial.

 

 

Part 2 coming soon.


 

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